Sports

NEMS Race at Waterville Valley NH

NEMS races two New Hampshire legendary mountains

For East Coast ski racers, Waterville Valley and Canon Mountain are the places where East Coast ski racing came of age. After a five year hiatus, New England Masters Skiing returned to Waterville for 2 GS races on Friday, Jan. 20th. The races took place on the legendary World Cup trail, an opportunity that drew some of the best Masters skiers in the region. On Saturday, Jan. 21st, Masters moved to Canon Mountain for the Hochgebirge Challenge Cup Slalom race, the oldest team ski race in the United States.

FIFA World Cup is usually a world bonding experience, not this time.

The World Cup Dilemma

World Cup soccer was designed as a celebration of global unity and diversity through sport, but not in 2022.

Mikaela Shiffrin celebrates with the Killington Cup trophy after winning the Slalom discipline at the FIS Ski World Cup at Killington, Vermont, on November 26, 2017. ©Mark D Phillips

The Queen of Killington

Mikaela Shiffrin returns to Vermont for the Heroic Killington Cup, scheduled for Thanksgiving weekend 2022, and it will be the last chance to see the US Women’s Alpine ski team compete on the East Coast of the US. Next year, the competition moves to Canada’s Mont Tremblant.

Max Scherzer makes a rehab start for the Binghamton Rumble Ponies against the Hartford Yardgoats Double-A game at Dunkin Donuts Stadium in Hartford, CT, on June 29, 2022. ©Mark D Phillips

Rehab Starts: Scherzer is a Rumble Pony

Max Scherzer makes a rehab start for the Binghamton Rumble Ponies against the Hartford Yardgoats Double-A game at Dunkin Donuts Stadium in Hartford, CT, on June 29, 2022. ©Mark D Phillips There are times when I want to shoot baseball because of the situation. When I heard that Max Scherzer […]

Maccabiah Field Hockey on Saturday, May 28, 2022, at the Big Apple Tournament (May 28-29) at Aviator Sports Complex in Brooklyn, NY

Maccabiah: “The Jewish Olympics” take front stage in July

It started with a dream. It’s hard to wrap one’s head around it today. But at the end of the 19th century, Jews in Europe were officially barred from taking part in athletic competitions. As anti-Semitism raged in cities, towns and countrysides across the continent, Jewish people were forbidden membership in sports associations.