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Art on the Stoop continues through November 8 at the Brooklyn Museum and will feature major works by contemporary artists

Art on the Stoop, Studio 54 launch Brooklyn Museum reopening

When you have one of the largest front stoops in Brooklyn, it makes sense to turn it into an outdoor performance location. The Brooklyn Museum hosts Art on the Stoop: Sunset Screenings, an outdoor exhibition of video art on its public plaza, every Wednesday through Sunday evening. And timed tickets are available for the indoor galleries.

Performing in the Age of COVID​

In the 18 weeks since we started this new reality, I have missed live music almost more than sports. When I heard that my friend Frank Manzi was going to play outdoors in the Berkshires, I decided to take a ride to see if it was going to work. And I can emphatically say that yes it did.

Since 2016, the patch of graffiti on a warehouse by the Carroll Street Bridge on the bank of the Gowanus Canal welcomed visitors with the tagline ‘Welcome to Venice’ with the signature "Love Jerko." But just like the Canal itself, it became a victim of gentrification. The former home of Alex Figliolia Water & Sewer, the 65,000-square-foot industrial building disappeared without a trace. On my first visit to the canal since the pandemic struck, I had one of those "Oh No" moments when I drove across the historic Carroll Street Bridge and realized the graffiti covered wall was gone. Not just gone but obliterated like it had never been there. ©Mark D Phillips

Another One Bites the Dust

The former home of Alex Figliolia Water & Sewer, the 65,000-square-foot industrial building disappeared without a trace. Since 2016, the patch of graffiti on a warehouse by the Carroll Street Bridge on the bank of the Gowanus Canal welcomed visitors with the tagline ‘Welcome to Venice’ with the signature “Love Jerko.” But just like the Canal itself, it became a victim of gentrification.

New Britain Bees Manager Ray Guarino wears a mask as a player stands behind in the dugout with the whole first row over the dugout empty during their FCBL game with the Nashua Silver Knights. ©Mark D Phillips

This is sports in the age of COVID-19

As football and hockey teams prepare for a fanless experience, in New England, something approaching a return to normalcy — socially distanced and face-mask-wearing normalcy, naturally — is happening. Since June 2, the Futures Collegiate Baseball League, now in its 10th season, has been holding games, with a reduced number of fans in the seats, in six venues from New Britain, Connecticut to Nashua, New Hampshire.