Photography’s Pioneers

How many of Photography’s Pioneers choose Green-Wood cemetery as their final resting place?

Photography’s Pioneers

How many of Photography’s Pioneers choose Green-Wood cemetery as their final resting place? Join Jeff Richman, Green-Wood’s historian, on a first-ever tour of the pioneers of photography who are now permanent residents of the cemetery on Saturday, November 11, 2017, from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm.

A year after Green-Wood was founded in 1838, Louis Daguerre introduced the world to his latest invention, photography.

A fascinating world of innovators and inventors are in the cemetery, including Francois Gouraud, the agent Daguerre sent to America to introduce his revolutionary creation; John Draper whose gravestone incorrectly states that he was the first person to photograph a human face in America and his son Henry, who pioneered photographs of the moon; Edward Anthony, the largest publisher (with his brother Henry) of Civil War images; and Alexander Becker, the man who invented a machine that allowed people to travel the world in 3D from the comfort of their parlors; and many more.

With Green-Wood's rolling hills and phenomenal views, it is fitting that photographers would choose the location as their spot for eternity. This is one tour that will bring photography even stronger to Green-Wood.

Full Moon from negatives taken by Prof. H. Draper with his silvered glass telescope
Niagara Falls, NY. C. Bierstadt. N.D. (1865–, 1865. 92) 3 1/2" x 7" Stereoscopic views of the moon were among the first experiments in celestial photography by Lewis M. Rutherford and Henry Draper in the 1860's. Bierstadt Brothers published Rutherford's work in 1864. Bierstadt also published these views of the moon from Draper's stereo negatives of 1865.

 

PURCHASE TICKETS
$20 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $25 for non-members